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little girl

little girlAs soon as I finished teaching the second seminar we hopped in a taxi for the twenty minute ride to my hotel just outside of Arusha.  We got a place for me to stay and after dinner I crashed.  Teaching six days in a row after flying 24 hours took the stuffing out of me.  Dickson had me scheduled to teach in his church the next day, so I got up early to go over my message, then headed to the church.  I was glad that after lunch at church I was able to go back to the room and rest for a bit.

I’ve had a lot of ugali (thick grits) and beef gravy while I’ve been here.  It’s really good, but a little messy.  You pull off part of the ugali and form it into a ball with a hole partially though it, then you dip it into the gravy and eat it.  The pastors and I had a good laugh at Betty the first time she tried eating gravy with her hands.  She had it dripping halfway to her elbow, but she got the hang of it really fast.

The pastors in the third seminar have had more schooling than the other two groups, so I didn’t have to do as much explaining and we were able to go a little faster.  On the second day one of the men stood up and told the pastors he had been in my seminar in ’97 and how much it has meant in his life and ministry these past 15 years.  He encouraged the pastors to listen  carefully and take good notes, then to make sure they put it into practice.

The seminars are over, now I will be meeting with some of the men who were in my previous seminars and the man who will translate our material into Swahili.  Thanks for praying me through this trip.  I’ll hop on a plane on Saturday and arrive home on  Sunday.  Ken

Ken and a Friend
Ken and a Friend
Scenes from Arusha
Scenes from Arusha

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the other Diary Entries

Please Continue to Pray for WDA, Ken and especially the people who have received training in Disciple Building. WDA is having an impact Worldwide through our staff and leaders around the world.

Part 1, Part 2, Part 3

Ken Hewett and Dickson

highwayAs soon as I finished teaching the first seminar we hopped on a bus and traveled to Maji Ya Chai.  That means ‘Water Like Tea’ in Swahili.  It’s a good name because the water is as brown as tea and the peoples’ teeth are stained the same color.  You can always tell if someone is from this area, or if there is a stranger in their midst.

I spent quite a bit of time talking to Greggory MFinanga, a layman who  attended the seminar. Greggory is a really huge guy who is in a wheelchair that’s like a tricycle.  The pedals are up at shoulder height and he propels himself around using his arms (which are as big as my thighs). It would be hard enough to get around on paved roads, I don’t know how he does it in all this dirt.

Greggory was excited to find out that he has been discipling young men without even knowing it!  He has a couple of small groups that meet regularly and he said they are growing in Christ-like character.  Greggory can read English, so I gave him a CD with our Phase II Bible Studies on it.   He is looking forward to teaching the Bible Studies and  putting all his other material together in an organized way.

Charles’ pastors’ group has been a fun group to teach.  I could spend the rest of my life in this area.  They are so needy and eager to learn and they have really caught the vision.  The problem is to get our Phase II Bible Studies translated into Swahili.  Dickson knows a man who can do the translating for just $3 a page.  I hope to meet with him when we’re in Arusha for the next seminar.  Be praying with me that we can get the finances to help these pastors out.

Off to Arusha and the third seminar….

Ken

Obama and the Pope Mural
Obama and the Pope Mural
Ken Hewett and Dickson
Ken and Dickson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Posts in this Series:

Tanzania Diary -Ken Hewett I

Tanzania Diary – Ken Hewett II

Kilmanjaro
Kilmanjaro
Mt Kilmanjaro

I arrived in Tanzania at 9:00 on Sunday evening and made the 1-hour trip to Moshi, a town near the airport.  Every time I’m in Moshi, it reminds me of a wild west town.  I was stuck here a couple of years ago when the sun was just beginning to set and the buses had stopped running.  I finally found a hotel with one long hall, with the only toilet at the end of the hall.  The electricity went off as soon as I checked in, but I had my trusty flashlight along.  My stomach was upset because I had eaten some VERY rare goat with a Masai chieftain and I kept running back and forth down the hall and back with my toilet paper in one hand and the flashlight in the other!  That’s the memory of Moshi that sticks with me.

Although the road between the airport and town is considered a highway, it’s very narrow and several times I had to close my eyes so I didn’t see what was happening. Dickson took me to a hotel and we checked in so we could both get some sleep before the seminar began on Monday morning. I was really pleased with the way Dickson set up the seminar. There were 20 pastors who attended, which was a good number for that area. They were very attentive and a real joy to teach. They’re excited about starting to disciple their people.

Please be praying for us as we move to teach for Charles Sengasu and his pastors’ group. Charles was in the group I lived with and taught in Lushoto for six weeks, in ’94. Charles is a pastor who works discipling other pastors. He’s a really faithful man. Pray also for my strength. I’ll be teaching three seminars in a row without a day off.

Previous Post: Tanzania Diary – Ken Hewett I

Arusha Tanzania

At 2:00 on Saturday I’ll be on a plane, headed for Detroit and my final destination of Kilimanjaro Airport in Tanzania.  Pastor Nnko, our Associate staff in Tanzania for almost twenty years, was a prolific church planter before he died in 2012.  Nnko began almost 25 churches and each one is pastored by one of his disciples.  He named the churches all ‘Grace Evangelical Church’ because he thought that was a cool name!

Dickson Lazier is one of his disciples.  Dickson pastors the church in Arusha, which was built by a group of men from our church here in Fayetteville.  I’ll be teaching three seminars for Nnko’s disciples since they are like sheep without a shepherd since he died.  I hope to re-focus their vision on helping their people to grow in Christ-like character.

Please be praying for Dickson and Pastor Charles Sengasu as they coordinate the seminars and for health and strength for me.

Thanks, Ken

Dickson's Church
Dickson’s Church
Arusha Tanzania
Arusha Tanzania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is part four of the series The Difficulty of Sharing Our Faith. from Gospel Centered  Discipleship

I’ve often heard people say the reason they find it difficult to share their faith is because they don’t have all the right answers. “What if someone suggests all paths lead to the same God, making Jesus irrelevant?” they say. Or “What if a co-worker claims she could never be a Christian because the Bible has too many errors?” These are serious questions that deserve thoughtful responses. As Christians, we should have reasons for our hope. However, I wonder if we often put our hope in having right answers instead of hoping in the reason for our faith? Let’s consider the role of “right answers” in the difficulty of sharing our faith.

Reasons for Hope

While some consider Christianity to be an unthinking faith, the Bible underscores the importance of reason. Peter, a disciple not known for being good with words, wrote this: “Have no fear of them, nor be troubled, but in your hearts honor Christ the Lord as holy, always being prepared to make a defense to anyone who asks you for a reason for the hope that is in you.” (1 Pet 3:14-15).

We are to offer “reasons” for our hope, to always be prepared. Prepared to do what? “Make a defense” is a translation of the word from which we getapologetic. An apologetic isn’t an “I’m sorry” attitude. Nor is it a defensive, antagonistic stance against culture. It is a reasoned statement of belief. To make an apologetic, then, is not to argue out of defensive insecurity, but to offer a reasonable explanation from our security. What kind of security frees us to offer reasonable explanations for our faith?

Two kinds of security free us to engage in apologetics. The first is intellectual security. The Christian faith has a long tradition of apologists who have faithfully defended the faith century after century, answering some of the most difficult questions. The earliest apologists include: Justin Martyr, Tertullian, Tatian, and Clement of Alexandria (view their texts here). Their apologetic answers have been handed down from generation to generation. New apologists, such as Ravi ZachariasWilliam Lane CraigTim Keller, John Frame, and Alvin Plantinga, also address new questions. We do well to read them.

It is important to note that the gospel alone acts as a grand apologetic, addressing the deepest of life’s questions including: the problem of evil and suffering, the existence of God, the hope of salvation, the nature of God and man, and the role of faith. Through apologetics the gospel has proven intellectually credible and existentially satisfying for many people across many cultures. The gospel provides a coherent, rational view on the world that is intellectually secure. It makes sense of a world where things are not as they are supposed to be. But there is another security that frees us to offer reasonable explanations for Christian faith.

Deep Security

Many of us won’t make time to read the old and new apologists. And perhaps we don’t have to. Is it possible that Peter had in mind an apologetic that included, not just reasons, but faith? Peter was writing to people who feared persecution for their faith. When we struggle to share our faith, do we not face persecution? We are attacked by thoughts that undermine our confidence, diminish our trust in Christ, and redirect us away from speaking about Jesus. Surely, this is a spiritual persecution. Cultural apologist Ken Myers has said:

“the challenge of living with popular culture may well be as serious for modern Christians as persecution and plagues were for the saints of earlier centuries.[1]

While we may not face the gallows or plagues, we do face something more subtle–the invisible power of pop culture that undermines truth, dismisses character, and radically orients us toward comfort. The good news is that we have the same ability as those early saints to be secure and strong in our faith. When doubts surface and silent accusations fly on the cusp of mentioning the gospel, we need a security stronger than our persecution.

Before instructing the early Christians to always have an apologetic, Peter prefaces his statement with this: “Have no fear of them, nor be troubled, but in your hearts honor Christ the Lord as holy…” (1 Pet. 3:14). He reassures them, in the face of mockery, to sink their security deep into their hearts not heads. He reminds them that they have nothing to fear because they have Christ who offers perfect peace. He makes apologetics about Christ not right answers, a matter of both the head and the heart.

So, when we face that moment of temptation to shy away from identifying with Jesus, it is our identity in Jesus that we need most. We need not fear men because we can rest in Christ. People may reject us, but our forever acceptance in Christ gives us every reason to speak of Him, of His grace, mercy, kindness, love, and triumph over sin, death, and evil. O for stronger men and women who sink their identity deeply into what Jesus says about us more than what peers and co-workers (might) say about us! Our silence will convince no one of our rich, rewarding faith in Jesus. Fear over co-worker frowns will not inspire a smiling faith.

Authentic Apologetics

Our moment of opportunity is less about converting others and more about staying true to ourselves. Will we speak of our unique community in the church, the God-intoxicating gathering on Sunday, the stirring time of meditation on Wednesday morning, and the quiet, soul stirrings of communion with God? Will we speak authentically about what matters most to us and of the meaningful events in our lives or will we prove inauthentic, dismissing these things from conversation, and along with them, dismissing our true selves? Will we refrain from honoring the Lord Christ as holy in our hearts because we hold in honor the passing frowns of men in our heads? Surely the gospel offers a deeper security than the approval of passing men and women? Does not Christ’s love run deeper, His acceptance purer, and His approval longer than the love, acceptance, and approval that any person could ever give? If so, apologetics is meant to spring from a deep security in the heart, our unshakable union with Christ—fully loved, fully accepted. Apologetics is a matter of the heart as well as the head.

Defending the faith, then, is as much about defending Christ as our Lord in our hearts as it is explaining the reasonableness of our faith. The goal of apologetics should never be to convert others (that is the Spirit’s job), but it is to honor Christ as Lord in our hearts. This happens, very often, with our mouths. And in the end, for everyone the bottom-line issue isn’t an intellectual objection but hope objection. We refuse to remove our hope from one thing and transfer it to the ultimate thing, the person of Jesus. A witness of our authentic hope in Christ will be more compelling than any intellectual argument we could ever articulate. People need to see our hope burn in our bones. They need to sense the Lord Christ set apart in our hearts. They need to see that the gospel not only makes sense but that it also works. Christian faith is intellectually satisfying and existentially rich. So let’s not put our hope in having right answers but have answers that reflect our hope.

 


[1] Ken Myers, All God’s Children and Blue Suede Shoes: Christians and Popular Culture (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 1989), v.

Jonathan K. Dodson (MDiv; ThM) serves as a pastor of Austin City Life in Austin, Texas. He is the author of Gospel-Centered Discipleship and has written articles in numerous blogs and journals such as The Resurgence, The Journal of Biblical Counseling, and Boundless. He has discipled men and women abroad and at home for almost two decades, taking great delight in communicating the gospel and seeing Christ formed in others. Twitter:@Jonathan_Dodson