Richmond Wandera moved to a 12×12 hut in a Kampala slum after his father was murdered when he was young. His mother sent him out to the streets to fend for himself until a young woman named heather began to sponsor his education through Compassion International.

 

Since then, Richmond has earned a masters degree from Moody Bible Institute and a PhD in philosophy from Lancaster college. He spent 6 months studying the gospels to learn how Jesus multiplied disciples that could disciple nations. He has since returned to Uganda where he founded the Pastor’s Discipleship Network with a passion to see Uganda’s 85,000 pastors deeply grounded in God’s word.

 

In 2016, Richmond spearheaded a campaign to build the Daraja Center which has been used to train over 2,500 pastors so far.

 

Richmond’s enthusiasm and vision for discipling the nation of Uganda is contagious. I found myself thinking after our conversations that God would use him powerfully in the transformation of his own country. His passion to develop research-based solutions to pressing problems and his willingness to think outside the box make him a formidable leader. Yet I also found him to be warm and engaging as he shared his eagerness to draw people into the life of Christ through a deeper understanding of God’s word.

 

For more information on resources discussed in today’s episode:

Global Disciple Builder: http://www.globaldisciplebuilder.com

Global Disciple Builder Facebook Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/globaldisciplebuilder/

Worldwide Discipleship Association: http://www.disciplebuilding.org

Pastor’s Discipleship Network: www.pdnafrica.org

Lancaster Bible College: www.lbc.edu

Moody Bible Institute: www.moody.edu

Arahdna Music: www.arahdnamusic.com

Contact Nate: nharkness@disciplebuilding.org

Dr. Harvey Kwiyani is a professor of African Christianity and Theology at Liverpool Hope University in the United Kingdom. Originally from Malawi, Harvey received his PhD in Theology from Luther Seminary in St. Paul, MN where I frist met him. He is the author of Sent Forth: African Missionary Work in the West. He is also the founder of Missio Africanus, a new initiative designed to train global Christians living in the west to engage thoughtfully in mission and navigate cross-cultural barriers. Harvey has become a thought leader on reverse mission in which global Christians from the two-thirds world are living intentionally and missionaly in Europe and North America in hope of revitalizing Western Christianity.

 

I’m personally excited about the conversation because Harvey has been a personal friend for many years and is one the first African friends to help me understand the world of African theology and spirituality. Over lunch one day he told me about the Bantu philosophy of Ubuntu and I ran home so excited to write a blog post on the connections between the humanizing tradition of Ubuntu and the work of making disciples of Jesus. Harvey and I have spent time together on 3 continents and I have grown to appreciate him as a fresh voice in the global conversation on global theology and mission.

 

For more information on resources discussed in today’s episode:

Dr. Harvey Kwiyani: hope.ac.uk/staff/kwiyanh.html

Sent Forth book: a.co/7SvaGVV 

Missio Africanus: www.missioafricanus.org

Nate’s blog on Ubuntu: www.jesusnomads.com/2012/02/ubuntu-humanization-through.html

Nate’s video for Missio Africanus: www.vimeo.com/117239602

Global Disciple Builder: www.globaldisciplebuilder.com

Global Disciple Builder Facebook Group: www.facebook.com/groups/globaldisciplebuilder/

Worldwide Discipleship Association: www.disciplebuilding.org

Arahdna (music on today’s episode): www.arahdnamusic.com

 

Graham Standish is the pastor of Calvin Presbyterian Church in Zelienople Pennsylvania. He is also an adjunct professor at Pittsburgh theological seminary and Tyndale theological seminary in Toronto. Graham is the author of several books including in God’s presence: encountering, experiencing, and embracing the holy and worship, humble leadership, and becoming a blessed church: forming a church of spiritual purpose, present, and power.

What fascinated me about Graham is the way he shepherded his own presbyterian congregation in discernment and a spiritual practices. He transitioned his church from a congregational model to a spirit led model in which everything from Bible studies to committee meetings are shaped not by Roberts rules of order, but by prayerful attentiveness to what the Spirit is saying and doing in every situation.

After stumbling accidentally across the presence of Jesus in healing patients at a psychiatric hospital where he served as a therapist, Graham enrolled in a PhD program at Duquesne University, where he studied Christian spirituality from Catholic, Protestant, charismatic, and contemplative traditions. His work and writing is permeated by a deeply Trinitarian theology and a simple confidence that God is at work in every situation and our job is simply to discern and cooperate with his movement.

For more information on resources discussed in today’s episode:

Global Disciple Builder: www.globaldisciplebuilder.com

Global Disciple Builder Facebook Group: www.facebook.com/groups/globaldisciplebuilder/

Worldwide Discipleship Association: www.disciplebuilding.org

Graham Standish: www.ngrahamstandish.org

Graham’s writings: www.amazon.com/N.-Graham-Standish/e/B000APLCY8/

Calvin Presbyterian Church: www.calvinchurchzelie.org/

Duquense University: www.duq.edu/

Tim Coons: www.giantsandpilgrims.com

whistle

 

Life Coaching, an Introduction

“When I return to my hometown I often meet someone who says, “I’ll never forget your dad.  He taught me to play baseball.”  My father coached in the recreation league for nearly twenty years.  Several of his players played professionally, including two of my brothers.  (Watching one of them pitch a scoreless inning in the World Series is still one of the highlights of my life.)  Ironically, “Pap” was never a star himself.  Most of his short career was spent in the minor leagues during the Depression, struggling to find a place in the starting rotation.  But he loved the game.  He died several years ago but his legacy lives on, immortalized by a small plaque at one of the city parks and through the lives of countless boys who played on one of his teams.”

“He coached at a time when some fathers were unavailable, so he became a surrogate dad to my friends, instilling skills on the field and discipline in the dugout.  But there was something else.  After the games the team would sometimes show up at our house for a meal.  He would move from player to player replaying the game as he rubbed heads and offered words of encouragement.  My father never achieved what many would call success, working hard all his life with few tangible results.  But when I bump into one of his former players, I’m amazed at the impact of his life.”

“Nearly everyone I know has had a similar experience.  For some it was a teacher who influenced their lives, others followed the lead of a drama coach, for some a music instructor or close relative helped to shape their formative years.  Many young people had a coach similar to my dad, someone who taught them more than game strategies and mechanics.  These people who influence and strategically shape the lives of others can be called Life Coaches.  The most successful instill more than training and discipline, they impart their very lives to others.  Of course, the best Life Coach of all is a caring parent.  Moses admonished the parents of Israel to teach the laws of God to their children as they went about the routines of life.  It was in the course of ordinary activities that lives were changed.”

The WDA Life Coaching Manual:

“It’s uncertain exactly how the term “Life Coach” became part of the popular vernacular, but the concept describes a person who is able to provide guidance, insight, and experience to others who are striving to succeed at various endeavors.  Used in the business world it refers to someone able to help others become profitable in commercial ventures.  In athletics, it’s a person who prescribes workout routines to maximize physical strength and prowess.  Used in a more general sense, it means anyone skilled at helping others remain focused and goal-driven.  Sometimes a Life Coach can be someone the ‘disciple’ has never actually met face-to-face.  In these cases, the insights are gleaned from books and tapes or by attending conferences.”

“But [the WDA Life Coaching Manual] is about a different kind of Life Coach.  It’s about Christian leaders who are willing to invest their knowledge and experience and even their very lives so that others might deepen their spirituality and relationship with God.  A spiritual Life Coach is a person who, in the midst of a caring relationship, imparts truth that changes the life (conduct/character) of another, gradually helping the disciple become more like Jesus Christ.  In WDA, we often use the phrase, ‘meeting people where they are and helping them take the next step®’ to describe the life-coaching process.  Those who are helped may not fully realize it until later, but they’re forever impacted by the life and example of these leaders.  It was Jesus who said ‘but everyone [disciple], after he has been fully trained, will be like his teacher.'(NAS)  Used in this way, there’s another term that can be substituted for ‘Life Coaching,’ ‘disciple building.'”

How have people invested in your life?  Take some time to write a comment and share the ways God has used people to impact you.

Consider picking up a copy of Life Coaching! Coming Soon at the WDA Store!

Coming up Next: Spiritual Life Coaching

*editors note: The quoted passages are from WDA’s upcoming Life Coaching Manual by Bob Dukes with Jack Larson and Margaret Garner.

All I needed to know about Leadership, I learned riding my bike!

Dr. Phil, Dr. Seuss, Dr. Spock, Dr. Dobson who is right? I mean each of them tell me they have figured out the best process for me to raise my children, resolve conflict at work and to share a great life with my wife.

Every magazine I read in the grocery check out line tells me they have a lock on relationships, on personal development, on how to manage my life. I wonder if there really is some formula for how to go about improving my stance with those I love, I manage and meet each day.

Somehow it seems that relationship, information, process, all work together but I am really not sure which one, in what order matters most. However, after looking at a zillion different improvement formulas I have come across one that just seems to make the most sense.

The process goes by the acronym R-CAPS and the letters stand for Relationship, Content, Accountability, Prayer and Structures. The process says that in order to grow myself or others that I must first develop a relationship that fosters trust and safety, then I can introduce content that is specific to what I want to achieve, accountability means to have people in place who care enough to help me stay the course, Prayer is asking God to intervene and sustain me. Finally it is important to have structures or situations in which to prove out and practice what I have learned.

father son bikeAs I think back to situations in which I really grew I see these elements in place. As I remember learning to ride my first bike I remember my dad holding on to the seat holding me up. I knew my dad was not going to let me get hurt, I mean I really trusted him. I also remember him telling me specifics about holding the handle bars in a straight line and remembering to pedal to maintain enough speed in order to not fall over. As I began to get the hang of things dad kept reminding me to “steer straight and keep pedaling” he kept me focused on what was important. Pray-you bet! Dad was asking the Dad of all dads to not let me get hurt. Finally, rather than just tell me about a bike, dad had me on a bike, in a safe place, practicing. When the time came to let go, I was ready and away I went.

Flash forward forty years and it is time for me to mentor a young friend. It seems that spending time with him, learning about him and his interests is the best way for us to develop trust and learn to believe in each other. Sure he wants to learn stuff, but I need to listen well and look for the signs to understand just what it is he really needs to learn. As I pay attention to what he says and observe his life I begin to understand just what content to introduce him to. Giving him information is not worth much unless I hold him to his promise to begin to use it. So much I cannot control, only God can know the depth of our hearts and minds, so I spend time speaking to God to ask for His protection and care for my friend. Finally, and often the hard part, is to find a specific activity that will let him use his new found knowledge.

Think about it. What good is it to learn about building a dog house if we do not actually try it out by building a dog house. By the way, dogs do not live in dog house theories they live in actual dog houses! Kids do not learn to ride a bike by reading a book, they learn to ride bikes by……riding a bike! And adults do not learn to mature and grow by just getting more information. Just like riding a bike, maturity takes practice, accountability and the right structures in which to try out what we are learning.

R-CAPS is a method that just makes sense. What is really cool is that it is a process that is over 2000 years old. It has been used on every continent and every nation in the world. The “process” book is well known and easy to find. The teacher, the most acclaimed “growth coach” the world has ever known. To learn more read about the R-CAPS method and the organization that developed it follow this link to the book MATURITY MATTERS.

Editors Note: We are reposting some of our blogs for you.  David Parfitt originally posted this article in 2011.  We think it is worth re-reading!